Inflation/Deflation

Emerging Markets – Crucial Points to be Aware of When Investing in the “Region”

What Investor Excitement Is Ignoring….

Inflation is like sin; every government denounces it and every government practices it – Frederick Leith-Ross

One of the most interesting market moves in 2010 was the significant outperformance of US equities over Chinese, despite far weaker GDP growth numbers. What many missed is the fact that it is not absolute values but relative figures / surprises which move markets. With this in mind, is it worrying that the consensus for China’s long term earnings growth is forecasted at 18%? Not much room is left for upside surprises, but there’s plenty of space for disappointment!

Source: "The Surprising truth about Investing in the BRICs" on Nicholas Vardy's The Global Guru, http://www.theglobalguru.com/article.php?id=340&offer=GURU001.

Therefore, it is important to be aware of the issues and risks associated with the region to be able to decide not only what to invest in but how to size the investment accordingly, inline with risk / return targets. As expressed above, it is crucial to judge what you believe is already priced into the markets and what pose as upside or downside potential.

Short-Term EM Risks

Short-term cyclical factors can overshadow long-term structural trends

INFLATION: the index used to calculate inflation in EM has double the exposure to food prices than in the G10 (developed countries). Using the price of wheat as an example – an all time high was reached at the beginning of this month, highlighting the magnified pressure felt in the region which may spook investors. From another angle, fiscal policy in China led to a 30% growth in the money supply (M2) in 2009, increased by almost as much again last year, stoking inflationary fears (since with more money around, it becomes worth less and more of it is required to buy goods i.e. goods become more expensive)

ALLOCATIONS: a record percentage of portfolio managers are overweight Emerging Market equities. The combined net assets of the two largest EM ETFs are now above that for the S&P 500, despite the US equity market being ~4 times the size of the investable EM universe.

Long-Term EM Risks

Long-term demographics may negatively affect the working population

AGE TRENDS: the biggest drop in the young working age population is “set to take place in China,” a result of its one-child policy.

ACCESS TO EDUCATION: Of the top 50 universities, only 3 are based in emerging market countries and the highest stay rate is among Chinese students. This means that in order to get a top quality education, the youth of Emerging Markets may have to study abroad and if they do so, may end up staying, greatly limiting the young, well-educated working class of their homeland.

EM Stock Risks

Do due diligence on the companies you pick – you may not be getting the exposure you want

EXPOSURE: just 14% of EM market cap is represented by domestic-facing sectors (i.e. not all EM stocks give investors exposure to the rise of the Consumer and the “Domestic Demand” growth story, a main reason for investment)

GOVERNMENT INTERVENTION: Within the EM stock markets, government ownership of companies is significant. For the Chinese market, 67% of its market cap is government owned (35% in Russia, 29% in India and 14% in Brazil). Putting this in context, in the US, at the height of the financial crisis, government ownership was about 3.7% of market cap. The importance of this should not be underestimated. It means that at times, within EM, a majority government owned entity may not be acting entirely in the interests of the investors.

STOCK EXAMPLE: Petrobras (PBR):  Brazilian government and its affiliates own about 64% of common voting shares. The offering documents state that “the government, as our principal shareholder, has and may pursue in the future, certain of its macroeconomic and social objectives through us.”

INVESTMENT INSIGHT

Therefore, in conclusion: Be aware –

Short-term cyclical factors can overshadow long-term structural trends

Long-term demographics may negatively affect the EM working population

Do due diligence on the companies you pick – you may not be getting the exposure you want

A “House View”

The search for yield is becoming an ever tougher quest for investors, especially the more cautious amongst us. Arguably, the easy money has already been made within the fixed income space; cash offers little as an investment vehicle and many question what the growth drivers will be behind many developed market economies and stock markets. Thus we are left asking, where should one invest?

We also need to question the type of environment we are investing in. Government action will be highly influential as it exits from its policy of Monetary Easing. Timing will be crucial but almost impossible to get right. Too early and we risk dipping back into recession and experiencing the destructive forces of deflation; too late and the threat of rampant inflation rears its head.  The consensus is that the government will favour the latter option as the lesser of two evils. Either way, any recovery the world sees may be a volatile one and clarity may remain elusive. Concerns over debt are still acute and here in the UK the Government predicts expenditure, revenues and debt are to get worse before getting better.

Thus I highlight the importance of an active management approach to investing, where the manager has the ability to react quickly to the changing environment and provide protection on the downside. Focus is also on being selective within each asset class. Although no longer a broad-based trade, opportunities remain within fixed income, with quality paramount and the focus on being name specific. Equities are looking more interesting. Nevertheless, with the potential for corrections in the markets in the near-term, investing with long / short managers, who have a proven track record of navigating the choppy markets of the last few years successfully and who are well-positioned to exploit opportunities both on the upside and downside, is attractive.

Emphasis is on being pro-active rather than reactive and continuing to monitor the changing economic and market environments closely.

INVESTMENT INSIGHT

ACTIVE MANAGEMENT

ALLOCATE TO EQUITIES

ANTICIPATE A MARKET PULLBACK (i.e. invest via long/short managers able to protect on the downside)