Assets

Why Europe Is Doing The ‘Ice Bucket Challenge’ With A Glass Of Water

‘Grand’ gestures with minimal effects, Europe is doing the ‘Ice Bucket Challenge’ with a glass of water. Measures won’t measure up to much. Little movement in interest rates, not enough assets to buy and ultimately – you can put out as many cream cakes as you’d like, but if people aren’t hungry, they aren’t going to eat. The pressure is rising and more is needed. Europe has become a ‘binary trade’, and it is important to invest in those set to benefit regardless.

(Click on the image below for a quick video clip summary)

cnbc FMHR Sept 2014

2 Measures That Won’t Measure Up To Much… (more…)

How to handle hedge fund investing

Whilst at GAIM, the world’s largest alternative investment & hedge fund conference, it was hard to ignore both the issues the hedge fund industry face and the opportunities from which they can profit. So how can you, as an investor, handle hedge fund investing? Be strategic, be sensible and speak up….

Fees – How can you challenge them?

Bigger isn’t always better. Instead it was the larger funds that had trouble liquidating large positions to meet redemptions in 2008 and this was amplified in Fund of Funds structures. The resulting side pockets and gates, which locked up investor capital, burned bridges. Therefore, funds merely offering access to large ‘star’ fund managers with limited attention to downside and liquidity risks no longer appear to be as wise an investment as once perceived.

A due diligence downfall.  Some funds of hedge funds had exposure to Madoff and other hedge fund failures. Therefore, ‘outsourcing’ hedge fund investment to a dedicated fund manager did not always reduce risk.

Strategy choice – Does it matter?

A ‘typical’ hedge fund does not exist. A hedge fund index is an artificial averaging of a wide range of performance data. In fact, over the past 2 years, the best performing hedge fund strategy has generated 160% more return than the worst. Yes, 160%! Even year to year the rankings change. By investing in completely different assets, implementing vastly different investment processes, hedge funds can perform in entirely different directions in a variety of market conditions.

Source: http://www.advisoranalyst.com. Hedge fund strategies ranked by performance each year, showing the variability in strategy leadership.

Value – How can hedge fund investments benefit your portfolio?

Well-equipped. With doubts over the sustainability of the ‘recovery’ in the developed world shaking equity markets; turmoil in the middle east creating volatility in commodities and the sovereign debt crisis rocking the bond markets, having a wider range of tools to exploit the uncertainty is valuable

A diversifier.  Widespread fear and the increase of speculators in certain markets has resulted in heightened correlation between asset classes, for example, equities and commodities have been moving inline…. An active manager who can provide uncorrelated returns to diversify a portfolio and steady the return profile again is attractive

Differentiating. In contrast, correlations between investments within each asset class are falling. The FT recently reported that the correlation between stocks in the S&P 500 index has fallen to levels not seen since June 2007. This means there is a widening divergence between returns.  Therefore, the ability to differentiate between opportunities within a subset is a strength of active over passive investing.

So what can you do?

Be strategic: strategy choice matters so utilize your views on the macroeconomic environment to help determine which strategies in which to invest

Be sensible: ensure funds deserve the fees they are charging, e.g. are focused on portfolio construction, generating returns from niche strategies, and structured appropriately with the redemption frequency matching the liquidity of the underlying investments.

Speak up: it is as important for BOTH sides to manage expectations to avoid redemptions from investors, and side pockets from funds.

Gold may Glitter but can it Deliver?

The classic “safe-haven” investment has seen a strong uptrend in its value since the autumn of 2008. Risk aversioninflation fearsfalls in the dollar and demand from the east have all been credited as drivers of this move. But just how supportive are these factors going forward — what is the risk gold could lose its lustre?

A Hedge against Inflation

The fear of inflation is heating up as on Wednesday the Bank of England suggested that “there is a good chance” inflation will hit 5% later in the year, far above the target rate of 2%. Elsewhere, on the same day, Chinese inflation figures surprised on the upside. However, is gold an adequate hedge? It can be shown graphically that it is not. Charting the inflation rate (CPI change year on year) against the gold price, we can see that over the past decade the relationship breaks down. Indeed, if the gold price kept up with increases in general price levels, it would be valued at $2,600 an ounce instead of around the $1,500 level. How about if instead of actual inflation, we look at the market’s expectation of inflation? Even in this case, the relationship does not hold. Instead, there are other factors at play. As previously discussed, investors may be more focused on the sustainability of the economic growth rate and allow for some inflation. Inflation alone may not provide sufficient support.

The Gold Price (white) vs. CPI change year-on-year (orange). Source: Bloomberg

A Beneficiary of Risk Aversion

So — could upcoming economic, fiscal or political disappointments sufficiently boost the gold price? Here the case looks stronger. From sovereign debt crises in Europe, to the tragic tsunami in Japan and the turmoil in the Middle East, there has been enough newsflow to stoke fears and flows into gold (a “whopping” $679m of capital was invested in precious metals in one week alone at the beginning of April). Furthermore, a lack of confidence in the dollar further boosted investment for those looking for a more reliable base.

Demand from the East and Central Banks

In addition to jewellery demand, central bank purchases may provide much support for gold as we move forward. Russia needs to acquire more than 1,000 tons and China 3,000 tons to have a gold reserve ratio to outstanding currency on parity with the U.S. This is even likely to be an understatement with China stating publicly they would like to acquire at least 6,000 tons and there are unofficial rumors that this may go as high as 10,000 tons.

A bubble with no clear end

George Soros described gold as the “ultimate asset bubble” and with sentiment driving the price as much as fundamentals, it’s unclear when the trend will reverse. An increasing monetary base is looking for a home. As Marcus Grubb, MD of Investment at the World Gold Council was quoted as saying at a ‘WealthBriefing’ Breakfast on Thursday: “In the next 10 minutes the world’s gold producers will mine $3m of gold, while the US prints $15m.” However, an often-overlooked drawback in investing in gold is its lack of yield. With some stock offering attractive dividend yields and investors wanting their investments to provide attractive returns during the life of their investment, capital flows may wander.

The Investment Insight

Remain wary of relying on one driver of returns; it can often be overshadowed by another. Instead build a complete picture and continuously question your base case scenario. Gold is a more complex asset than many give it credit for and as always, it pays to be well diversified.