stock market

How To Keep Your Head When Those Around You Are Losing Theirs

Learn the secret of how to make money while those around you are fearful, in under 2 minutes. Explanation in the text below, as well as advice on how to react to recent stock market moves.

How to keep your head when those around you are losing theirs.

  • Firstly get better informed by asking 3 simple questions: What’s really going on? Why is it happening? What could happen next?
  • Then work out how it could affect you with another 3 simple questions.

The recent turmoil in the financial markets is a great example. Investors seemed to be losing their heads. (more…)

1 Simple Rule To Tell Who’s Naked & How To Avoid Losing Money

“In light of the naked celebrity photos doing the rounds, I’m going to tell you today how to tell who’s really naked in Silicon Valley and beyond.

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Why the Tech Sector is not a ‘Bubble’ & How to Trade it

Published in CityAM (thanks to Liam Ward Proud) and broadcast on CNBC.

cityam (more…)

Your 5-a-day: 5 of The Biggest Misunderstandings Cleared Up

‘Wind down’ is not withdrawal but watch negative news flow in the US; treading water is not growth so keep the champagne on ice for Europe; price is not value so beware investor sentiment; falling unemployment is not rising employment so watch the participation rate; and a hiccup is not a correction so keep an eye on an exit…

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5 Ways To Check You’re Not Late To The Stock Market Party

The room’s getting crowded, the party’s been going on a while but more people could arrive. Just beware fair weather friends and a sign it could be time to think about leaving…

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Let’s Kiss More: Here’s Why & How

“Today I’m going to teach you to kiss. At work. On TV. In life or death situations. I’m going to show you how. And then when we go our separate ways you’re going to kiss with other people more than you’ve ever done before!.

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Economic ‘Potholes’ Ahead

Gemma Godfrey highlights the factors that could cause a pullback in markets and provide buying opportunities, on CNBC’s Fast Money. Published on cnbc.com by Bruno J. Navarro.

Disappointing growth in Germany, the potential for political deadlock in Italy and corruption allegations in Spain appears to be increasing risk.

Market elation has been a little bit too early, moved a little bit too far, and there are these potholes that actually could cause markets to stumble, at least in the shorter term. Markets do not like uncertainty, and the longer this continues, the longer the uncertainty is over the markets, the more likely is it will have a pullback.

The U.S. stock market is approaching 500 days since a 10 percent-plus correction, which she said was the tenth-longest time in history that such a bull run has occurred.

And it means when we’re looking at where valuations are , they’re no longer cheap with respect to the U.S. market, growth isn’t coming through as we thought it was going to come through, and you’ve got this level of uncertainty, meaning that it is more likely that these momentum followers – for example, the hedge funds are buying into financials – that they’re going to start to stumble.

But I do think that that means if we do see a correction, it could be muted because it’ll be a fantastic buying opportunity for those investors that are looking to rotate back into risk assets because over long-term, we’re actually more bullish about equities.

Low interest rates, credit spreads at multiyear lows and the prospects of a return to growth could still bode well for equities.

What the market needed was confidence and the return of depositors to put their money into European banks, something that hasn’t happened sufficiently.

All of that gives us slight cause for concern, meaning that we’re growing more cautious shorter-term, although, obviously, more bullish longer-term.”

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And just a reminder of why Spain has been able to withstand bailout pressure and markets have shrugged off European woes until recently…

Why Olympic Success Must Inspire Action in Europe

Central banks are running out of steam as their measures to bring calm back to markets are no longer as effective as they once were. Germany too seems unable to keep up. Like a marathon runner caught in a sprint, their reluctance to move forward stands in stark contrast to market moves focused on the end game. But the road isn’t clear. Europe has three remaining hurdles in their race to recovery: funds, fiscal unity and reform. With Greece approaching the final whistle, doubts over its ability to stay within Europe are growing louder. The worry is investors are watching the referee not the striker, more focused on the search for safety than the rising risk elsewhere in the markets. False starts continue to drive market volatility and while investors ask whether it’s time to back the ‘underdog’, European stocks may provide diamonds in rough, but things could get rougher.

Watch the debate in a quick CNBC clip:

How Europe’s Crisis is Like the Olympics & How to Trade These Markets

 

Central Banks: Running out of steam

The vital relationship between central banks implementing stimulus and Spanish yields falling has broken down since April of this year. No longer is central bank action able to reassure the market and instead Spain and Italy’s borrowing costs remain at elevated levels. Investors are demanding more. Structural change is needed but markets are concerned that leaders could choke under the pressure.

Germany: A marathon runner caught in a sprint

Germany wants to progress towards greater unity at its own pace but the markets move faster. Indeed a backbencher delivered his dissatisfaction with the European Central Bank’s plans to their Constitutional Court! It will be tackled in September but investors and the economy won’t wait. Weak consumer confidence and rating agency scepticism highlight the urgency for action.

Europe: 3 Hurdles in Race to Recovery

The three key obstacles to be tackled to progress towards stability are: enough funds to contain the crisis; fiscal consolidation (share budgets in order to share debt burdens and be able to offer ‘eurobonds’); and finally structural reform to regain competitiveness & growth. All are vital for the future of the region and this realisation is starting to build within the markets. Europe did manage to overcome their concern that a Fed-Style straight bond buying programme would reduce the pressure on countries to reform, with a Memorandum of Understanding putting these measures on paper. The use of ‘MOU’s in order to accept ‘IOU’s to lend to countries within Europe may be a step forward, but this remains only part of the full picture needed for longer-lasting results.

Greece: Approaching the Final Whistle

S&P ratings agency has questioned whether Greece will be able to secure the next tranche of bailout funds as it downgraded the outlook for its credit rating to negative. Without such funding, the ‘death knell’ for Greece’s euro membership will be sounded. With the IMFsignalling payments to Greece will stop, the lack of funding fuels fears that without drastic action, the end could be near. Even beyond Greece, the Italian Prime Minister dared to publicise the possibility of a Eurozone breakup if borrowing costs did not fall.

Investors: Watching the Referee not the Striker

The rush to safety has been overshadowing rising risksAs investors pile in to perceived ‘safe haven’ assets, the yield on German government bonds has been falling. However, in a different market, the cost of insuring these bonds has risen as these investors see risk on the rise. The snapback in bond markets to better reflect this sentiment could shake the equity market as well and is therefore a significant concern.

Markets: False Starts

Markets have rallied in the face of disappointing data. Eurozone stocks reached a 4 monthhigh as manufacturing dropped to a 3 year low suggesting the slump is extending into Q3. This discrepancy has driven market volatility, exacerbated by the low volume of shares traded over the summer months. Greater clarity is required to see a more sustained upward momentum which will have to wait until leaders are back from their hols!

Investments: When to Back the Underdog?

European stocks may provide diamonds in rough, but things could get rougher. The overweight US / underweight EU trade is starting to look stretched, as the divergence in performance between the two regions continues to increase. This has been quite understandable, but there will come a time when this is overdone. Within Europe, there are international companies, with geographically diversified revenue streams so not dependent solely on domestic demand for their products or services. Furthermore, with effective management teams and strong fiscal positions, some may be starting to look cheap. However, cheap could get cheaper. Damage to sentiment could lead to market punishment regardless of fundamentals. Therefore waiting for decisive developments & clarity on road to recovery may be prudent.

Bank Scandals: Is This Just The Tip Of The Iceberg?

From accusations of interest rate manipulation, to charges of illegally hiding transactions with Iran, the spotlight is well and truly on the banking industry. Institutions appear to have been operating right at the edge of what’s reasonable where the line between right and wrong can become blurred. Crucially, it highlights how issues can occur outside ‘investment banking’, and therefore attempts to classify one part of the industry as bad and one part good is flawed. Nevertheless, public opinion is against the banks and it’s up to them to earn back respect. We’re entering a tough new paradigm of tighter regulation, greater demands for transparency and less incentive to lend. Vindication, conviction and takeovers are all possible but one thing we can be more certain of, the regulator is watching closely and further turmoil is likely.

Working On The Border Between What’s Right And Wrong

Standard Chartered has been accused of illegally hiding transactions with Iran. The aggressive attack of money laundering charges came as a shock to investors, who punished the bank’s shares with a sell-off of more than 16%, wiping $6bn from its market value. So what can we take away from this latest scandal? Is this a one-off or an indication of an industry wide shortfall?

The complication seems to arise from the claim that the bank was already working openly with US agencies and 99.9% of this business complied with legislation.

However therein lies the shortfall, the opaqueness. Investors maintain these discussions should have been better highlighted in their last annual results. The confusion surrounding whether they did or did not do wrong may signal that they could have been operating right at the edge of what’s reasonable.

With a focus on profits and market share, the line between right and wrong can become blurred. Indeed previous fines have merely moved not mitigated risk. As other banks closed their doors on these types of transactions, Standard Chartered, it has been argued, may have instead welcomed the new business. Changing this culture may prove prudent.

Issues Aren’t Black & White But Murkier ‘Shades Of Grey’

An interesting aspect of this investigation is the type of bank business it is targeting. This is not an investment banking scandal. Instead commercial banking dealings are under attack. Could this have been avoided by having investment banking and retail banking separated? Arguably no.  It is not as binary as one part good, one part bad and not all banks overall are the same as each other either.

Indeed, investment banking can help subsidise the cost for running other banking operations and although transgressions may have been made, not all who work in the industry can be tarred with the same brush.

A New Paradigm

There is huge political capital in ‘bank bashing’, finding a common ‘enemy’ to engender sympathy and support.  But the pressure is on the banks to earn back trust. Likewise, whilst banks have to get used to tougher regulation, we must accept that fines could erode their reserves and reduce their incentive to lend. A tougher ‘new paradigm’. Furthermore, whilst financial institutions must accept greater demand for transparency, both banks and regulators must improve the way they communicate with the public to avoid unnecessary panic.

What’s Next?

Vindication? Conviction? Takeover? Next Wednesday we’ll hear Standard Charter’s response to these accusations. Analysts admit that at this stage it’s hard to know which way the case will go. An unintended consequence could be a potential takeover, with JP Morgan already mentioned as a possible buyer (source: John Kirk at Redburn). As some hope to split banks up so they are easier to control, this would not be a welcomed outcome. Meanwhile the LIBOR scandal continues as additional institutions are investigated. Further turmoil is likely. And the regulator is watching…