volatility

How To Keep Your Head When Those Around You Are Losing Theirs

Learn the secret of how to make money while those around you are fearful, in under 2 minutes. Explanation in the text below, as well as advice on how to react to recent stock market moves.

How to keep your head when those around you are losing theirs.

  • Firstly get better informed by asking 3 simple questions: What’s really going on? Why is it happening? What could happen next?
  • Then work out how it could affect you with another 3 simple questions.

The recent turmoil in the financial markets is a great example. Investors seemed to be losing their heads. (more…)

5 Ways To Check You’re Not Late To The Stock Market Party

The room’s getting crowded, the party’s been going on a while but more people could arrive. Just beware fair weather friends and a sign it could be time to think about leaving…

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From Rome With Love? The 3 Issues To Watch For Italy & Global Markets

This article made the Front Page of the Huffington Post Business

Political uncertainty in Italy could impact global markets, but provide a “fantastic buying opportunity.”

cnbc squawk

Like Jennifer Lawrence’s fall at the Oscars, unexpected but a chance to shine ‘comedically‘, Italy’s elections have shocked investors but provided attractive entry points to strong international firms, insulated from domestic woes (as well as offer up some funny one-liners from candidates). The possible loss of eagerly anticipated labour reforms, financial restrictions and market contagion provide shorter term sources of turmoil. However, existing reforms are likely to continue, market retrenchment is healthy and to be exploited for longer term opportunities.

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A Greek default on the cards but the banks aren’t listening

The markets expect a Greek default and time is running out. However, banks still haven’t recognised enough of this loss, highlighting the pent-up risk in the sector. Deep-seated scepticism continues to drive market volatility and this will continue until a credible plan is on the table.

A Greek default due

Markets are pricing in a 93% probability Greece will default, with the country missing its deficit reduction targets, contracting greater than anticipated (-5.5% vs. -3.8%) and unable to meet salary and pension obligations within the next couple of weeks. However, there is still much uncertainty on what the next steps will be. Politicians are still clinging to the hope further bailouts will help and hinting they will demand private investors to bear a bigger part of the pain (“technical revisions” to allow greater haircut) but Finland is demanding collateral and time is running out.

“Time to move”

Despite ‘kicking the can down the road’ and delaying decisions over the next tranche of the Greek bailout, the markets are looking to the G20 meeting in Cannes on 3rd – 4th November as the final deadline for decisive action. Political pressure is high as Geitner demands it’s “time to move” and Obama issues some stark words accusing the EU of having a fiscal plan that is “scaring the world”.

Banks are not prepared

Dexia, one of Europe’s largest banks, hit the news with their need for some form of rescue. Their reliance on short term funding may be their current problem but the outlook is no more rosey. They have only reduced the value of their Greek bond debt exposure by 21%. If they, along with BNP Paribas and Soc Gen write-down these debts by 51%, that will cause massive losses amounting to E3bn. That’s of course assuming Greece doesn’t fully renege on all outstanding loans due.

Pent up risk

Therefore there are still many events that could shock the markets. Although so far market falls have been followed by short term rallies as investors use the opportunity to buy back into the markets. Crucially though, upside and downside moves are exhibiting a large amount of intra-day volatility. This highlights the deep seated scepticism that will only be removed once a credible and clear long-term plan is put into action. Until that time, the swings will continue.

CNBC Clip: Europe Weighing on Markets

Europe – Lacking a Long-Term Solution

Over the last few days we have seen a tremendous amount of volatility in the markets, epitomising the lack of clarity with which many investors have struggled. The contagion continues to spread as we hear rumours of a possible downgrade of French government debt although it is far more likely to occur for Italy first. Fundamentally, there is a lack of a long-term solution and the knee-jerk reaction by some EU countries to ban short selling not only misses the point, it may negatively impact the very stocks it is trying to protect. So as we see movement to safe havens, we also see room for opportunistic buying – as long as you invest with those with strong balance sheets unlikely to be hit in future earnings downgrades and have a long enough time horizon to withstand the volatility.

Italy and France to be downgraded? The Contagion Continues to Spread

The markets are already betting for the ratings agencies to downgrade France’s debt with credit default swap spreads widening to double their level at the beginning of July. A rising expense to insure against default implies the market believes it to be more likely. However, Italy is the more likely downgrade candidate in the short-term. The reasons given behind Portugal’s downgrade a few months back apply equally to Italy – an unsustainable debt burden (Italy has the third largest in the word at €1.8tn) and a low likelihood of being able to repay these obligations (as it dips back into recession). The European Financial Stability Fund is losing its credibility since even its increase to €440bn is not enough to cover future potential bailouts and would need to amount to at least €2tn. The crux of the problem, as I’ve iterated before, is that you can’t solve the problem of debt with debt and austerity does not foster growth. Instead debt burdens are increasing at a faster rate than GDP growth in many western economies so the situation is only getting worse.

Outlook for banks: Headwinds for banks remain

European banks remain highly correlated to the future of the periphery. German banks, for example, have exposure to the PIIGS (Portugal, Ireland, Italy and Spain) amounting to more than 18% of German GDP. Commerzbank revealed that a €760m write-down for Greek debt holdings wiped out their entire Q2 earnings. That’s before we look at France who have an even higher exposure and here in the UK, our banks have nearly £100bn exposed to struggling economies. Furthermore, these banks need to refinance maturing debt (at a rate of €5.4tn over the next 24 months) at higher rates and with demand shrinking.

Will the ban on short-selling help? No, it misses the point

The markets are concerned with government fiscal credibility not its regulatory might. Instead, the ban could increase volatility and negatively impact the very stocks it is trying to protect. ‘Shorting’ was acknowledged by the Committee for European Securities Regulators as beneficial for “price discovery, liquidity and risk management” just last year, so we may well see higher volatility than we would have without. Secondly, it limits fund ability to bet on financials going up. Hedge funds use shorts to remove market risk, buying shares in one bank and borrowing and selling shares in another. If they are forced to close these ‘borrowed’ positions, they will have to sell the other bank shares they have bought outright, causing further selling pressure and price falls. Most interesting was the timing of the implementation, just before an announcement was made that the Greek economy shrank by 7% in Q2 – fuelling fears the ban was needed since there’s more bad news to come.

How to trade these markets: Movement to safe haven offering opportunities

So how can you invest in these markets? A possible support to the stock markets is the ‘search for yield’. Sitting on cash can’t be satisfying for long, with rates as low as they are, and the dividend yield on the Eurostoxx is now double the 10 year German ‘bund’ yield. This means that even if markets go sideways, the return generated from holding European stocks could be more attractive than either if the other options. In addition, valuations are looking reasonable, at a near 8x forward earnings. Therefore we may see flows returning to the markets. However, be warned, we are starting to see earnings downgrades and volatility may remain. Therefore invest in companies with strong balance sheets and maintain a medium to longer-term time horizon.

How to handle hedge fund investing

Whilst at GAIM, the world’s largest alternative investment & hedge fund conference, it was hard to ignore both the issues the hedge fund industry face and the opportunities from which they can profit. So how can you, as an investor, handle hedge fund investing? Be strategic, be sensible and speak up….

Fees – How can you challenge them?

Bigger isn’t always better. Instead it was the larger funds that had trouble liquidating large positions to meet redemptions in 2008 and this was amplified in Fund of Funds structures. The resulting side pockets and gates, which locked up investor capital, burned bridges. Therefore, funds merely offering access to large ‘star’ fund managers with limited attention to downside and liquidity risks no longer appear to be as wise an investment as once perceived.

A due diligence downfall.  Some funds of hedge funds had exposure to Madoff and other hedge fund failures. Therefore, ‘outsourcing’ hedge fund investment to a dedicated fund manager did not always reduce risk.

Strategy choice – Does it matter?

A ‘typical’ hedge fund does not exist. A hedge fund index is an artificial averaging of a wide range of performance data. In fact, over the past 2 years, the best performing hedge fund strategy has generated 160% more return than the worst. Yes, 160%! Even year to year the rankings change. By investing in completely different assets, implementing vastly different investment processes, hedge funds can perform in entirely different directions in a variety of market conditions.

Source: http://www.advisoranalyst.com. Hedge fund strategies ranked by performance each year, showing the variability in strategy leadership.

Value – How can hedge fund investments benefit your portfolio?

Well-equipped. With doubts over the sustainability of the ‘recovery’ in the developed world shaking equity markets; turmoil in the middle east creating volatility in commodities and the sovereign debt crisis rocking the bond markets, having a wider range of tools to exploit the uncertainty is valuable

A diversifier.  Widespread fear and the increase of speculators in certain markets has resulted in heightened correlation between asset classes, for example, equities and commodities have been moving inline…. An active manager who can provide uncorrelated returns to diversify a portfolio and steady the return profile again is attractive

Differentiating. In contrast, correlations between investments within each asset class are falling. The FT recently reported that the correlation between stocks in the S&P 500 index has fallen to levels not seen since June 2007. This means there is a widening divergence between returns.  Therefore, the ability to differentiate between opportunities within a subset is a strength of active over passive investing.

So what can you do?

Be strategic: strategy choice matters so utilize your views on the macroeconomic environment to help determine which strategies in which to invest

Be sensible: ensure funds deserve the fees they are charging, e.g. are focused on portfolio construction, generating returns from niche strategies, and structured appropriately with the redemption frequency matching the liquidity of the underlying investments.

Speak up: it is as important for BOTH sides to manage expectations to avoid redemptions from investors, and side pockets from funds.

Libya – Oil, Water, Gold – The Real Issues

The oil price has sky rocketed over the past few months. The finger has been pointed at the troubles in Libya and claims of supply disruptions have dominated the press. However, are these claims grounded in fact or are we watching yet another sentiment driven bubble? What are the issues we should be aware of and how should we best invest in the face of such turmoil?

Expectations are often more damaging than reality

Libya’s contribution to global oil production is in stark contrast to the column inches it has been awarded in the press. As quoted by the National Journal, the country produces around 2% of the world’s oil. OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) has claimed that they have managed to “accommodate most of the shortfall” and instead attribute the rise in the oil price to fears of a shortage rather than any genuine supply issues. Oil reached a 2.5 year high last Friday. This is against a flattish demand side dynamic. Paris-based International Energy Agency and the U.S. government’s Energy Information Administration left fuel demand growth for this year unchanged and OPEC only raised their forecast by a relatively small amount (to 87.9m b/d from 87.8m b/d).

Note - this chart also highlights the Crude vs. Brent trade with the discount at record levels. Source: http://www.tradingnrg.com/crude-oil-price-forecast-recap-for-march-and-outlook-for-april-2011/

EU Sanction: A further boost for the oil bulls

On Tuesday, the EU extended sanctions against Libya to include energy companies, freezing assets in an attempt to force leader Muammar Gaddafi to relinquish power. Phrased another way, by the German Foreign Minister, this is a “de facto embargo on oil and gas”. Approximately 85% of exports are for delivery to Europe and importers will now have the task of finding potentially more distant and/or expensive alternative sources.

The pent-up downside risk

Nevertheless, many are not paying attention to the downside risk to the oil price as we move forward. Libya has Africa’s largest proven oil reserves but 75% of the country’s petrol needs are met with imports because of limited refinery capacity. Any improvement on this front, if a regime change is eventually secured, could significantly reduce imports and boost global supplies.

 Is water the next oil?

In addition to oil reserves, one asset belonging to the Libyan government which is rarely mentioned is an ability to bring water to the desert. With the largest and most expensive irrigation project in history, the $33bn GMMR (Great Man-Made River) project, Libya is able to provide 70% of the population with water for drinking and irrigation. The United Nations estimates that by 2050 more than two billion people in 48 countries will lack sufficient water, making this an enviable asset indeed.

How can the US pay for the Libya intervention?

It is interesting to note, with all the claims being made that the intervention is oil motivated that, Libya has another form of ‘liquidity’.  According to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the country’s central bank has nearly 144 tonnes of gold in its vaults…

How to best invest: Retain context

The tide is starting to turn, Goldman Sachs has called the top for commodities in the near-term and oil fell by 4.5% on Monday and Tuesday alone (Source Bloomberg) . With this amount of volatility, short term noise can sometimes overwhelm. For a long term investor, looking for steady and stable returns, an ability to cut through the sentiment (whilst acknowledging it’s importance in driving returns in the shorter term) is valuable. Often many factors are at play and it will ‘pay dividends’ to be well-informed as they become wider known and priced in by the markets. Knowledge may be king but preparation will come up trumps.

Our Macroeconomic thoughts… Something has to give…


Tzanetatos Capital Management LLC

The US Equity market in less than two years, as measured by the S&P500, has doubled from its post crisis March 2009 low. Volatility has sunk. US Unemployment remains high. The Fed is fueling a speculative boom with the riches accumulating to the few. US Labor struggling to get back to a decent or any work and the geopolitics paint a complete opposite picture to the market euphoria. All the while clouds in the global geopolitical sphere continue to gather pace. While in the west we measure progress many times by the rise or fall of the markets alone on a daily basis – For the people of Egypt the long struggle for jobs, social justice has only begun. On Feb 13th, the military council abolished the constitution… timetable to nowhere is all we can see… as the military positions to further consolidate its stranglehold on the people. Unrest potential is building in the Arab world. From the lands north of Sahara- Northern Africa. From the Nile to the Euphrates. From the Mediterranean to Mesopotamia. The two ‘I’s, Israel-Iran, eyeing each other and global players are taking positions. China has a new world status and it could test its newly found powers, all the while weaknesses are building into its own economic system that risk world destabilization. Change in the status quo in the middle east and elsewhere where pressures have been building for some time now can have seismic implications for growth of the world economy. Rather growth stalling at best with uncertainty keeping long term investment plans at bay and hungry jobless populations or democratically starved plutocratic nations citizens pressuring for reforms. Global aggregate demand on the government side is pressured to collapse as spending at current intervals is unsustainable. The pace of implementation of structural reforms is slow and major structural reforms measures are still to be taken. Will the Fed stimulus policies continue to keep the economy from faltering? We take the view that the higher you are the greater the fall and the highs we are now are not compatible with the struggle to put bread on the table for most families. Even in the most affluent of Nations. Ours. The Baltic index has closed at near quarter century lows. Ship oversupply? Yes. Australia flood impact? Yes. Trade used to be the life blood of world economy. Now it is finance. Speculative flows of money looking for a quick domicile for short term gain. Capital has always ruled the world but money movements of such intensity is a relatively new phenomenon that our econometric models do not have much historic data to go by. All is so synchronized now around the world. The supply of funding for excess speculative building abundant from the central authorities. Yet Trade the heart pulse of human global endevours and interactions since time in antiquity- trade- global trade- is telling us otherwise. Something is happening. Something big. The amount of trade is clearly going down as things look up in government, central banks and brokerage house reports. The Greek ships have been taking much to China but lately they come back many times empty. Yet the forward looking equity markets of our Western World…measures of progress in the eyes of many.. vain quests of financial engineering yet once more.. have been marching higher. Fundamental and technical traders follow the same momentum of a rising tide on stimulative action not structural reform. This is not healthy. The system has yet to cleanse itself. Something has to give…..

TZANETATOS CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LLC
CHICAGO
Past performance is not indicative of futures results.

http://www.TzanetatosCapital.com
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